Tag Archives: OEM Subwoofer Replacement

Replacing the Sub (…again!)

On the off chance that you’ve blown the paper cone OEM sub-woofer in your TJ, OR if some clown installed a small door speaker where your subwoofer is supposed to be, replacing it with a functioning product is not particularly difficult or expensive.  Jump on Amazon, pick up a Pyramid 6.5-Inch 300W White Injected Cone Woofer, and play along at home.

You’ll want to get started by removing the center console which is held on by three bolts covered by cup holders that remove by hand.  A 10 mm under the front cup holder and two star bits beneath the rear.

BEFORE you yank out the center console, GENTLY disconnect the wiring harness underneath the console from the Jeep.  Now remove the entire console.

With the center console removed, it’s time to extract the subwoofer and OEM amp.  Start by removing two phillips head screws inside the arm rest.  Next, remove three phillips head screws on the side of the console near the subwoofer grill.

Take a moment to marvel at what’s there and then remove 4 star bits from the 4 corners of the speaker.  That’s all that’s holding the speaker to the box.  My door speaker below has extra bolts that you won’t see on your OEM speaker because this is an adapter plate to fit a 5.25″ speaker into a 6.5″ slot.  The funny thing is that the previous installer spent almost as much on the adapter plate as the Pyramid sub for this install costs!

Remove/disconnect the speaker and set it aside.  Disconnecting may require a set of wire cutters if the wires are soldered.

To fit the Pyramid sub, a little trimming to the inside bottom of the speaker box is necessary since this speaker is a bit deeper than stock.  Not a lot, but enough that you need to cut down the plastic to make it fit.  I used a Dremel with a EZ544 cutting wheel to make short work of that plastic.  Yeah, I know that cut off wheel is designed for wood, but it’s what I had on hand and it did the trick with out any problems.  Keep the Dremel speed low, and go at it with a steady hand.

To help prevent any vibration or rattling, I put foam strips (available at any hardware store) around the lip of the speaker mounting location.  Nicer speakers typically come with foam strips for mounting, but when you use the $20 Amazon special, that sort of thing often gets left out.  No, you don’t need it, but I suggest it.

Next, connect the sub and please try to do a cleaner soldering job than I did.  Clearly, not my finest work.

To further increase the quality of my enclosure, I used a little filling to pad the inside of the sub box.  I’ll let you read up on why here.  To continue to keep the cost down, instead of proper polyfill, I snagged the cheapest firm pillow I could find at my local Target and borrowed a little of the stuffing.  (…man I hope I didn’t over fill it!)

With the wiring connected, the edge covered in foam, and the box stuffed, you can go ahead and install the speaker.  I tried to get as close as possible to the OEM holes, but in the end I had to drill small pilot holes about 1/8″ closer to the edge to mount the speaker.  Just a small pilot hole mind you, the speaker screws will dig in the rest.

Next, slide the speaker box back into the center console.  Loosely tighten the 3 phillips head screws on the side near the grill, next fully tighten the two screws inside the arm rest, finally go back around and fully tighten the screws on the side.

Reinstall the console in the reverse order that you removed it.  Connect the wiring harness and secure it to the console using OEM clips.  Install the console into place and finger tighten the front and rear bolts.  1o mm in the front, two star bit bolts in the rear.  Position the console in the final resting place and make sure to tuck the carpets how you want them to sit then tighten everything down.  Drop in the cup holder covers and enjoy your new sub!  Go ahead, crank it up!

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